Truthogen
Isaac Cordal - Cement Eclipses
Málaga. Spain 
Isaac Cordal is a sculpture artist from Galicia. His sculptures take the form of little people sculpted from concrete in ‘real’ situations.

Isaac Cordal - Cement Eclipses

Málaga. Spain


Isaac Cordal is a sculpture artist from Galicia. His sculptures take the form of little people sculpted from concrete in ‘real’ situations.

This periodic table table was built by element collector, Theodore Gray, to store his element samples. As he puts it;
"All these samples (well, at least the ones that fit) are stored in a wooden periodic table, by which I mean a physical table you can actually sit at, in my office at Wolfram Research. I decided to build this table by accident in early 2002, as a result of a misunderstanding while reading Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks. I won’t bore you with the details here (see the Complete Pictorial History of the Wooden Periodic Table Table), but once it was finished I felt obligated to start finding elements to go in it (because under the name of each element in my table there is a sample area).”

This periodic table table was built by element collector, Theodore Gray, to store his element samples. As he puts it;

"All these samples (well, at least the ones that fit) are stored in a wooden periodic table, by which I mean a physical table you can actually sit at, in my office at Wolfram Research.

I decided to build this table by accident in early 2002, as a result of a misunderstanding while reading Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks. I won’t bore you with the details here (see the Complete Pictorial History of the Wooden Periodic Table Table), but once it was finished I felt obligated to start finding elements to go in it (because under the name of each element in my table there is a sample area).”

Triple Fantasy
Illustration courtesy L. Calçada, ESO
Three stars—including the red dwarf Gliese 667 C (far left)—set over the “super Earth” Gliese 667 Cc in an artist’s conception.
Such rocky worlds abound around red dwarfs (stars smaller and cooler than our sun), according to March results from the HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) telescope at the European Southern Observatory. Radial velocity is a planet-hunting technique that looks for wobbles in a star’s light, which can indicate the gravitational tugs of orbiting worlds.
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Triple Fantasy

Illustration courtesy L. Calçada, ESO

Three stars—including the red dwarf Gliese 667 C (far left)—set over the “super Earth” Gliese 667 Cc in an artist’s conception.

Such rocky worlds abound around red dwarfs (stars smaller and cooler than our sun), according to March results from the HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) telescope at the European Southern Observatory. Radial velocity is a planet-hunting technique that looks for wobbles in a star’s light, which can indicate the gravitational tugs of orbiting worlds.

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Star Fields
Photograph courtesy Tunç Tezel, APOY/Royal Observatory
This image of the Milky Way’s vast star fields hanging over a valley of human-made light was recognized in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition run by the U.K.’s Royal Observatory Greenwich.
To get the shot, photographer Tunç Tezel trekked to Uludag National Park near his hometown of Bursa, Turkey. He intended to watch the moon and evening planets, then take in the Perseids meteor shower.

Star Fields

Photograph courtesy Tunç Tezel, APOY/Royal Observatory

This image of the Milky Way’s vast star fields hanging over a valley of human-made light was recognized in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition run by the U.K.’s Royal Observatory Greenwich.

To get the shot, photographer Tunç Tezel trekked to Uludag National Park near his hometown of Bursa, Turkey. He intended to watch the moon and evening planets, then take in the Perseids meteor shower.


NO MATCH FOR SIZE This dwarf chameleon (Brookesia micra) from Madagascar was formally recognized as a new species in February. Admittedly, this is a juvenile, but adults are not much larger: males reach just 16 millimetres in length and females grow to a whopping 30 mm, making this the smallest lizard in the world.
Frank Glaw

NO MATCH FOR SIZE This dwarf chameleon (Brookesia micra) from Madagascar was formally recognized as a new species in February. Admittedly, this is a juvenile, but adults are not much larger: males reach just 16 millimetres in length and females grow to a whopping 30 mm, making this the smallest lizard in the world.

Frank Glaw


FROM THE WOMBS OF BATS These apparitions — seemingly dreamed up by Swiss surrealist H. R. Giger — are embryos of the black mastiff bat (Molossus rufus). Biologist Dorit Hockman of the University of Cambridge, UK, took the picture using a standard dissecting microscope for inclusion in a system that documents embryo development.
Dorit Hockman/Univ. Cambridge/2012 Photomicrography Competition/Nikon Small World

FROM THE WOMBS OF BATS These apparitions — seemingly dreamed up by Swiss surrealist H. R. Giger — are embryos of the black mastiff bat (Molossus rufus). Biologist Dorit Hockman of the University of Cambridge, UK, took the picture using a standard dissecting microscope for inclusion in a system that documents embryo development.

Dorit Hockman/Univ. Cambridge/2012 Photomicrography Competition/Nikon Small World

sciencesoup:

Making Stars on Earth

Nuclear fusion is the reason our sun shines. It’s the process by which two atomic nuclei fuse into one, heavier nuclei—and the process by which stars produce energy. The heart of our Sun is a vast powerhouse, where the nuclear fusion of two hydrogen atoms into one helium atom radiates huge amounts of energy. Earth’s current nuclear reactors use nuclear fission, which produces energy by splitting one atom into two. This process creates harmful radioactive waste, but nuclear fusion is cleaner, safer, and more efficient. If we could effectively build our own star here on Earth—our own celestial power plant—we would have access to unlimited clean energy, but although decades of research has created glimpses of fusion reactions such as the JET (Joint European Torus) experimental fusion reactor pictured above, we have yet to learn how to usefully harness this energy. But what we’ve managed to create so far is still amazing. In Brian Cox’s words: “Scientists have learned how to create and hold star matter—a cocktail of gases heated to 100 million degrees. For a moment, a little piece of the sun springs into life on the Earth.”

(Image Credit: Wonders of the Universe)

ALMA antennas performing observations. (ESO)

Kola Superdeep Borehole, commemorated on the 1987 USSR stamp
The deepest hole ever drilled. On Kola Peninsula, Russia.

Kola Superdeep Borehole, commemorated on the 1987 USSR stamp

The deepest hole ever drilled. On Kola Peninsula, Russia.

Positrons are anti-electrons.

Positrons are anti-electrons.